Events 2021

events women

60 metres

as part of the World Athletics Indoor Tour

The magical seven seconds

From 1985 to 2006, the 60 metres was a fixed part of the programme at INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe. During this time, almost everyone gave their long legs the credit for their fast race times, be it Merlene Ottey or Irina Privalova, who both became the first women in the world to run the race in under seven seconds in Madrid on the 14 February 1992. Both were also winners at the INDOOR MEETING. Ottey won in 1995 and Privalova, who had meanwhile improved the still valid world record to 6.92 seconds, claimed victory in 1996. The 7.04 seconds she ran back then are still the Meeting record.
From 2010 on, a German athlete, Verena Sailer, also joined the mix. The 100-metre European champion in Barcelona in 2010 has always been at the front of the race and was only defeated by Bulgarian Ivet Lalova through a photo finish at the Meeting in 2013. Both finished the race within the same time of 7.19 seconds. In 2014, she was then able to win at the INDOOR MEETING for the first time. Verena Sailer is no longer competing, having retired in 2015. It took as many as three INDOOR MEETINGs for a German female athlete to triumph again in 2018. Following Great Britain's Dina Asher Smith (7.12 seconds in 2015), the Netherlands' Dafne Schippers (7.08 seconds in 2016), and Jamaica's Gayan Evans (7.14 seconds in 2017), this year's winner was Tatjana Pinto, with 7.10 seconds, the starting shot for a great year. In addition to her victory at the INDOOR MEETING, she also secured the title of German Indoor Champion in the 60 and 200-metre races and the bronze medal in the 4 x 100-metre relay race at the European Championships in Berlin. Last year, Ewa Swoboda won the women's race with the same time (7.10 seconds), a victory early in the year that set the tone for a successful year for her. The Polish sprinter followed up this gold medal with another at the European Indoor Championships in Glasgow. In the most recent edition of women's 60 metres at last year's event, Shania Collins from the USA managed to clinch victory. With a time of 7.20 seconds, she edged out Ajla del Ponte from Switzerland (7.27 seconds).

3.000 metres

as part of the World Athletics Indoor Tour

Almost new, but already Cult

It is the longest distance at the INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe: the women's 3000-metre race. This competition has only been on the agenda at the Meeting since 2010 but has been met with great enthusiasm by the athletics-mad spectators in Karlsruhe who have been particularly attached to the long distance since its premier. That surely has a lot to do with Haile Gebrselassie's unforgettable runs for the men, but what the women have offered spectators since their first appearance in 2010 is not at all lacking. Since then, the 3,000-metres race at the INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe has been among the most exciting events on the agenda. The last time the women ran the 3,000-metres was in 2017. The finish line was crossed at 8:26.41 minutes - a record for both the Meeting and for Europe. This spectacular time was run by the reigning European Champion for the 1,500-metre, Laura Muir. Last year, Melissa Courtnes from Great Britain, Alemaz Samuel and Guday Tsegay from Ethiopia, and Alina Reh from Germany also had the audience at the edge of their seats: They crossed the finish line just over a second apart. Fantu Worku from Ethiopia and Kenyan Quailyne Jebiwott Kiprop participated in an equally exciting race last year. Ultimately it was the Ethiopian Fantu Worku who secured victory over the 15 laps in a time of 8:37.58 minutes.

Shot Put

as part of the World Athletics Indoor Tour

Strong women take centre stage

The women's shot put fixture in 2021 indicates that the discipline, which had previously only featured once – namely in 2017 – in the Meeting programme, is becoming increasingly established. The women's shot put is one of the most successful disciplines in Germany and around the world. In recent years, it has been names like Astrid Kumbernuss, who won Olympic gold in Atlanta in 1996 and was World Champion three times, that have dominated. Or Nadine Kleinert, who has chalked up a total of four silver and two bronze medals at the Olympic Games and World Championships. More recently, Christina Schwanitz caused quite a stir when she picked up the World Championship title in 2015 with a shot of 20.37 metres and was subsequently voted German Athlete of the Year. In recent years, Valerie Adams dominated global shot put until injury prevented her from competing. The New Zealander is the only female athlete ever to have achieved a throw of over 21 metres, following the era of questionable records from the 1980s. However, neither Adams nor Schwanitz triumphed at the Olympic Games in Rio. The gold medal went to US athlete Michelle Carter, with Valerie Adams winning silver after her break from the sport due to injury. Christina Schwanitz, who was also forced to withdraw from almost the entire season due to injury, only achieved sixth place in Rio. She recently caused a stir in her native Germany at the European Championships in 2018, where she won a silver medal with a throw of 19.19 metres.

Triple Jump

as part of the World Athletics Indoor Tour

"Hop, Step, Jump"

In terms of technique, the triple jump probably belongs to the most difficult disciplines in athletics, because mastering the "hop", "step", and "jump" is anything but easy. But if they succeed, the best female athletes fly through the air for more than 15 meters. At the start of the millennium (2000 to 2006), the women's triple jump formed an integral part of the INDOOR MEETING's repertoire. Tatyana Lebedeva from Russia was the discipline's first winner, and she has managed to hold onto the indoor world record (15.36 meters) she set in Budapest since 2004. At the last edition in 2019, Ana Peleteiro from Spain won the gold with 14.51 meters.

1.500 metres

Out of tour

From Szabo to Dibaba

The women who have so far led the heat in the seven and a half stadium laps belong to the best that athletics has had to offer over the last nearly 35 years at the INDOOR MEETING in Karlsruhe for this middle distance. For example, one of the greats who has been a guest at the Europahalle and was able to celebrate a victory is the Romanian athlete Gabriela Szabo (1997). Szabo was particularly successful at the Olympic Games.
Additionally, Theresia Kiesl from Austria (1996) and another Romanian, Violeta Szekely (1999), are listed among the winners of the Meeting. Lidia Chojecka from Poland even celebrated a total of three victories. In recent years, the Ethiopian runners have dominated the 1500-meter race. Gelete Burka (2010) and Genzebe Dibaba (2012 and 2013) nearly succeeded in cracking the four-minute mark, and so Sports Director Alain Blondel was sure that the 2014 INDOOR MEETING would hold another meeting record in store. And he was right: In 3:55.17 minutes, Genzebe Dibaba not only pulverized the Meeting record, but also beat Elena Soboleva's world record by more than three seconds. Genzebe Dibaba just missed out on a meeting record at the last edition of the women's 1,500 meters on February 3rd, 2018. With a time of 3:57.45 minutes, the Ethiopian athlete won the day's event and relegated Germany's running star Konstanze Klosterhalfen (4:04.00 minutes) to second place. Last year, in the latest edition of the women's 1500 metres, Axumawit Embaye won in 4:07.94 minutes, a victory for her native Ethiopia.

60 metres hurdles

Out of tour

The magical seven seconds

From 1985 to 2006, the 60 metres was a fixed part of the programme at INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe. During this time, almost everyone gave their long legs the credit for their fast race times, be it Merlene Ottey or Irina Privalova, who both became the first women in the world to run the race in under seven seconds in Madrid on the 14 February 1992. Both were also winners at the INDOOR MEETING. Ottey won in 1995 and Privalova, who had meanwhile improved the still valid world record to 6.92 seconds, claimed victory in 1996. The 7.04 seconds she ran back then are still the Meeting record.
From 2010 on, a German athlete, Verena Sailer, also joined the mix. In the past three years, the 100-metre European champion in Barcelona in 2010 has always been at the front of the race and was only defeated by Bulgarian Ivet Lalova through a photo finish at the Meeting in 2013. Both finished the race within the same time of 7.19 seconds. In 2014, she was then able to win at the INDOOR MEETING for the first time. In the past year, Jamaican Gayon Evens secured her victory in the Karlsruhe Athletics Arena. While in the heats, she had to let Briton Dina Asher-Smith take the lead, but won the finals at the INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe in a time of 7.14 seconds. In the end, with first place in Karlsruhe, second place in Birmingham, as well as third place in Torun, Evans secured overall victory at the IAAF World Indoor Tour 2017. In the most recent edition of women's 60 metres hurdles at last year's event, Tobi Amusan from Nigeria managed to clinch victory. With a time of 7.84 seconds, she edged out Christina Clemons from the United States (7.98 seconds).

60 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Irina Privalova - 00:06,92 - RUS
11.02.1993, Madrid
 
EUROPEAN RECORD
Irina Privalova - 00:06,92 - RUS
11.02.1993, Madrid
 
MEETING RECORD
Irina Privalova - 00:07,04 - RUS
11.02.1996, Karlsruhe

3000 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Genzebe Dibaba - 08:16,60 - ETH
06.02.2014, Stockholm
 
EUROPEAN RECORD
Laura Muir - 08:26,41 - GBR
04.02.2017, Karlsruhe
 
MEETING RECORD
Laura Muir - 08:26,41 - GBR
04.02.2017, Karlsruhe

Shot Put Records

WORLD RECORD
Helena Fibingerova - 22.50 - CSSR
19.02.1977, Jablonec
 
EUROPEAN RECORD
Helena Fibingerova - 22.50 - CSSR
19.02.1977, Jablonec
 
MEETING RECORD
Christina Schwanitz - 18.41 - GER
04.02.2017, Karlsruhe

Triple Jump Records

WELTREKORD
Tatjana Lebedjewa - 15,36 - RUS
06.03.2004, Budapest
 
EUROPAREKORD
Tatjana Lebedjewa - 15,36 - RUS
06.03.2004, Budapest
 
MEETINGREKORD
Yamile Aldama - 14,88 - SDN
28.02.2003, Karlsruhe

1500 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Genzebe Dibaba - 03:55,17 - ETH
01.02.2014 Karlsruhe
 
EUROPEAN RECORD
Abeba Aregawi - 3:57,91 - SWE
06.02.2014, Stockholm
 
MEETING RECORD
Genzebe Dibaba - 03:55,17 - ETH
01.02.2014, Karlsruhe

60 M Hurdles Records

WORLD RECORD
Susanna Kallur - 00:07,68 - SWE
10.02.2008, Karlsruhe

EUROPEAN RECORD
Susanna Kallur - 00:07,68 - SWE
10.02.2008, Karlsruhe

MEETING RECORD
Susanna Kallur - 00:07,68 - SWE
10.02.2008, Karlsruhe

events men

60 metres hurdles

As part of the World Athletics Indoor Tour

The first winner was a decathlete

In 1986, the second year of the INDOOR MEETING, the men's 60-metre hurdles were on the programme for the first time. The first winner in this discipline was not a specialist, but a decathlete from Germany. Guido Kretschmar won with a time of 7.91 seconds. However, the victory of the man from Großheubach was not altogether surprising, as the hurdles were one of the speciality disciplines of the silver medallist in the decathlon at the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. Kretschmar was even the German champion several times in his youth - also over the hurdles. The boycott of the 1980 Olympics in Moscow most likely deprived him of an Olympic victory, as he had set a world record in the decathlon that year. However, over the short hurdle course, the specialists dominated in the following years. Above all, Colin Jackson. The Welshman, who won two world outdoor championships, one indoor title, and a silver medal at the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, became the European Outdoor Champion four times in a row. At the 1994 European Indoor Championships in Paris, he accomplished a historic double, winning both the 60-metres flat and over the hurdles. In addition, he still holds the world record of 7.30 seconds at this distance. Jackson, who won the meeting three times, set the tone for the hurdle sprint in the Europahalle, as did the Olympic champions, Liu Xiang (China), Dyron Robles (Cuba), Mark McKoy (Canada), and Allen Johnson (USA), who all left their mark in Karlsruhe. Johnson's meeting record of 7.38 seconds from 1995 has thus far withstood every challenge. Not even the Brit, Andrew Pozzi, could come close to this time. He won at the last event of men's hurdles in 2017 with a time of 7.44 seconds.

400 metres

As part of the World Athletics Indoor Tour

Full sprint over two laps of the stadium

The 400 metre race is the longest sprint discipline that is held both in- and outdoors. It is also held as both the fifth discipline in the mens decathlon and as a relay competition. When the men run at full speed all the way, they complete the distance in an incredible time of 43 seconds outdoors and 45 seconds indoors. The current indoor world record is 44.57 seconds and was run in 2005 by the American Kerron Clement. From 2012 to 2019, INDOOR MEETING fans had to forego the men’s 400 metres race. The same athlete won in both 2012 and 2019 – namely Pavel Maslak from the Czech Republic. In 2019, he won the race of two stadium laps in 46.78 seconds.

Long Jump

As part of the World Athletics Indoor Tour

Following the traces of the great Larry Myricks

The men’s long-jump competition was part of the INDOOR MEETING from the very start, at its first edition in 1985. US-American Larry Myricks won the competition back then. In the 1970’s, he ranked among the world’s best long jumpers. In total, he won the Meeting in Karlsruhe four times. Furthermore, Myricks holds the current Meeting record with 8.38 meters. Long jump held a regular spot in the INDOOR MEETING’s repertoire since its beginnings. But in the late 1990’s, the program’s focus shifted towards the triple jump. Only in 2010 did long jump regain its place in the program. The last German winner in the long jump was local hero Julian Howard in 2016. In 2015, he had lost the Spaniard Eusebio Caceres in the first year at the exhibition hall. A year later, the athlete from LG Region Karlsruhe jumped 8.03 metres, which earnt him the gold medal. Last year, in the latest edition of the men’s long jump, Caceres won with a jump of 7,99 metres.

800 metres

Out of tour

Turbo-Yuriy and his breathtaking finish

About 15 years have passed since a young Russian athlete downright turned the world of athletics upside down in the 800 meters. The unorthodox way in which Yuriy Borzakovskiy tackled this middle distance was unprecedented. Visitors at the 2001 INDOOR MEETING couldn't believe their eyes as the then 19-year-old lagged behind his opponents for two rounds at the Europahalle, all hope seemingly lost, but then turned on the turbo that would become his trademark. Borzakovskiy overtook the entire competition from last place, ran his opponents into the ground, and finished with a time that the Meeting had never seen and which would not be achieved again at a later time. The time read 1:44.15 minutes as the young Russian crossed the finish line. This was a Meeting record and basically the international birth of middle-distance superstar who was also able to celebrate victory at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. 2018, the men´s 800-metre was part of the IAAF World Indoor Tour indoor athletics series. At the start of the World Indoor Tour, Marcin Lewandowski won in Karlsruhe with a time of 1:46,90 minutes. However, the was only able to secure sceond place in the overall ranking with his victory in Karlsruhe and a second place in Glasgow. In 2019, Swedish runner Andreas Kramer won the gold with a time of 1:46.52 minutes, although he wasn't racing as part of the World Indoor Tour competition. Erik Sowinski from the USA took silver with 1:46.69 minutes. Mostafa Smaili from Marocco won an equally exciting race last year. Ultimately it was the Maroccan Smaili who secured victory over the 800 metres in a time of 1:46.38 minutes.

3.000 metres

Out of tour

Haile´s world

“More than 5,500 people are stomping and screaming their lungs out, the drums dully pound out a rhythm that draws in the crowd, a fresh breeze blows in from the open roof, and it isn't summer and we're not at the carnival in Rio. It is January, it is cold outside, and it takes quite a bit of imagination to explain to someone who happens to be visiting the city why the hall's roof should be open. You shouldn't even bother trying to explain why the 5,500 people inside are creating such infernal noise, but perhaps try using a name. It might be a bit of a tongue twister, but at least well known to those with ties to athletics and even more to those who know that the absolute greatest is a little man from Ethiopia who goes by the name Haile Gebrselassie.” These are the opening lines of a text that appeared in the publication SONNTAG on January 17, 1999, referring to the highlight event at the 15th INDOOR MEETING KARLSRUHE. The 3000 meters with the Ethiopian running legend Haile Gebrselassie, who won this race a total of five times at the Europahalle (1997,1998, 1999, 2003, and 2004), once with a new world record. Of course, the two-time 10 000 meter Olympic champion's time of 7:26.15 minutes in 1998 continues to represent a Meeting record. And the 3000 meters is a cult stretch, because Dieter Baumann, two-time winner of this race, also set a European Meeting record in 1995 with a time of 7:37.51 minutes. A time which has held up as the German indoor record. At every edition of the 3000 meters, the atmosphere in Karlsruhe is consistently high. It wasn't any different in the new stadium, where athletes competed in the medium-distance event in 2015, 2016, 2018 and 2020. In 2020, Bethwell Birgen won in a time of 7:38.50 minutes.

Pole Vault

Out of tour

In Lobinger´s living room

Someone who has won the same event seven times has earned the right to call his site of victory his “living room”. Tim Lobinger has mastered the feat of winning the pole vault competition seven times within a time period of eleven years at the Europahalle. On February 14, 1997, he stood at the top of the podium for the first time. His last Meeting victory dates back to February 10, 2008. In between, he secured the title in 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, and 2005. However, one thing was out of reach for him: The Meeting record remained unattainable for the first German pole vaulter to fly over the six-meter-mark outdoors in 1997. Sergej Bubka was able to maintain this record for many years with the 5.80 meters he cleared for his victory in 1991. A record that was matched by Michael Stolle in 1998, but which was not surpassed until 2013 by the French Olympic champion in London, Renaud Lavillenie, with 5.83 meters. But in 2015 (5.86 meters) and 2016 with 5.91 meters, Lavillenie outdid his own Meeting record from 2013. Back then, he asserted himself against Canadian Shawnacy Barber as well as Raphael Holzdeppe. While Raphael Holzdeppe had to content himself with third place in 2016, two years later he soared all the way to the top with his performance at the last edition of the men's pole vault. With a fantastic jump of 5.88 meters – still his personal best at an indoor event – the gold medalist from the 2013 Outdoor World Championships in Moscow clinched victory in the sold-out stadium ahead of pole vault superstar Renaud Lavillenie (5.83 meters). It was also Mr. Pole Vault who won the last pole vault competition at the INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe. With a height of 5.70 metres, he won last year's event in a brotherly duel against Valentin Lavillenie.

60 M Hurdles Records

WELTREKORD
Colin Jackson - 00:07,30 - GBR
06.03.1994, Sindelfingen
 
EUROPAREKORD
Colin Jackson - 00:07,30 - GBR
06.03.1994, Sindelfingen

MEETINGREKORD
Allen Johnson - 00:07,38 - USA
12.02.1995, Karlsruhe

400 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Kerron Clement - 44:57 - USA
13.03.2005, Fayetteville

EUROPEAN RECORD
Thomas Schönlebe - 45,05 - DDR
05.02.1988, Sindelfingen

MEETING RECORD
Thomas Schönlebe - 46,11 - DDR
11.02.1990, Karlsruhe

Long Jump Records

WORLD RECORD
Carl Lewis - 8,79 - USA
27.01.1984, New York

EUROPEAN RECORD
Sebastian Bayer - 8,71 - GER
08.03.2009, Turin

MEETING RECORD
Larry Myricks - 8,38 - USA
07.02.1988, Karlsruhe

800 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Wilson Kipketer - 01:42,67 - DEN
09.03.1997, Paris

EUROPEAN RECORD
Wilson Kipketer - 01:42,67 - DEN
09.03.1997, Paris

MEETING RECORD
Yuriy Borzakovskiy - 01:44,15 - RUS
27.01.2001, Karlsruhe

3000 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Daniel Komen - 07:24,90 - KEN
06.02.1998, Budapest

EUROPEAN RECORD
Sergio Sánchez - 07:32,41 - ESP
13.02.2010, Valencia

MEETING RECORD
Haile Gebreselassie - 07:26,15 - ETH
25.01.1998, Karlsruhe

Pole Vault Records

WORLD RECORD
Renaud Lavillenie - 6.16 - FRA
15.02.2014, Donezk

EUROPEAN RECORD
Renaud Lavillenie - 6.16 - FRA
15.02.2014, Donezk

MEETING RECORD
Renaud Lavillenie - 5.86 - FRA
06.02.2016, Karlsruhe